Building a home robot: Part 7 - the front RGB LED display

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A Raspberry Pi touchscreen is used to show Rooberts face. So it can´t be used to show status information like battery state or the “feelings” of its python finite state machine.

Fortunately the body front was still missing – so this seemed to be a good place to mount additional optical output.

I tried several small LCD- and OLED Displays, but they didn’t please me.

In the end I used an 8x8 Neopixel array, a 24 Neopixel ring and a 1 Neopixel lighted big button.

In the beginning the 8x8 pixel array was too bright to see the 8x8 pixel as one image. After attaching a 3d printed cover it looked like quadratic pixels.

The python code can read a GIF file and display it on the 8x8 pixel display. When in idle mode, Roobert shows a beating heart GIF.

The outer ring of Neopixels shows the battery state when driving around and the buttons Neopixel glows up when it seems to be a good idea to press it now.

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Building a home robot: Part 5 - arms and hands

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I wanted Roobert to get two identical hands with separate moveable fingers.

Because of this (and the small size) I decided to use a commercial construction kit instead of designing and constructing the hands on my own.

Although it was a construction kit it was fun for hours to assemble the hands:

Each arm is constructed from the hand construction kit, 3 servos, 3d printed servo brackets and an I2C servo controller. Because the servo controller seemed to be unable to shut down the servo power, I attached a relays for each arm to turn the servo power on/on.

The servo holder for the upper arm parts are printed in 3D:

The complete arms:

The right arm:

A roobert-hand-assembling-workplace :-)

Building a home robot: Part 4 - moving the head up and down

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Because the monitor and raspberry pi are placed in the front of the head most of weight is there. So the motors for up/down  movement have to be powerful enough to handle this.

I decided to use two stepper motors with built in gearboxes. They also are the axis for the head movement. I mounted them back to back into a 3d printed box ,so they are moving in contrariwise directions.

Putting together neck and front head:

Assembling including cables, Raspberry Pi and electronics:

The two stepper motors have much power - but still not enough to lift the head. To fix this problem I placed a counterbalance made from lead in the back of the head.

The first test with provisional counterbalance:

After some hours of testing another problem occurred. The mechanic connection between the two motors and the 3d printed part was very small.

Only 4mm PLA to connect  to the whole head wight and movement:

And the PLA material was not strong enough to handle this for a long time – so the freedom of movement increased.

To solve this I used two small parts of aluminum with holes matching to the axis of both stepper motors.

Building a home robot: Part 2 - Neck design and movement

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My first approach to move the neck and head was to use servos. Because the rotation has to move a large weight to rotate the head left/right, I bought a servo driven ball-bearing base.

The first try was a servo driven ball-bearing base.



Mechanical everything worked fine – the base had : enough power solve the movement.
But it was very loud. It made the typical plastic server “scrieeeee” sound and the base amplified the sound by acoustic resonance.
It all sounded like a big cheap RC toy from the 80s :-/ Nothing you want to hear from a futuristic robot with a cute and modern body design.

The next idea was to create laser cut gears on my own and mount them on a big ball-bearing:

As engine I wanted to use a stepper motor

Everything seems fine – even a first manual test moving the motor and gears by hand.
But the first electronic driven test was a little bit annoying: It was much more quiet and strong than the RC servo but still loud.

The next idea to solve this was to use a fan belt to connect the gears to prevent the plastic-on-plastic sound. But for this the complete construction would have to be changed.

So I tried another idea: Creating the motor gear  with 3d printing from rubber instead of laser cut acryl:

This worked very fine and now the gears are working very silent.

The endstop to home the rotation: