Pedestrian pathfinding part 2: Collision detection

I spent much time during the last weeks in programming the pedestrian pathfinding. After investing much work into the buggy implementation of evasion pathfinding algorithm and many hours of debugging now it seems to work.

Instead of the vehicle implementation (using Dijkstra pathfinding) for the pedestrian I use a jumpoint-pathfinding and a grid map. 

To prevent pedestrians from colliding with aother pedestrian, they mark their map pos as blocked (drawn red in the screenshot).



To synchronize between the vehicles and the pedestrians the vehicles project their actual position onto the pedestrian map (drawn black in the the screenshot). So no pedestrian can enter a field, a vehicle is driving across. 

Only for exceptional cases (when the blocking of the map has not prevented a collision) there is a front collider attached to each pedestrian.



Pathfinding seems to work fine now. So I can now go on with a little more exciting part of game development including graphic stuff and game mechanics.

Repair of my cobra robot

Last month I wanted to use my good old Cobra Robot for a new hobby project. 

I hadn´t used the robot for some months. When starting the control unit I noticed a smell like burnt electronics.

However, all functions of the robot still seemed to be working. But for safety reasons, it seemed advisable not to use the device.

Because my knowledge in electronics is limited I needed some help to find out what the exact problem was and how to repair it.

Fortunately, I had practical help of my good friend Jens and remote email support from the german cobra-robot guru Bernd Barnewald.

The first step was to check all voltages and fuses. All voltages seemed to be normal and stable, all fuses intact.

So all circuit boards had to be checked.